SANLiC 2019 Conference

Every second year, SANLiC hosts a member conference primarily for South African e-resource librarians. It is the ideal opportunity for e-resource librarians, library directors and librarians in general to gather, share, learn about latest developments in the field, recharge and have loads of fun. The SANLiC 2019 Conference took place at the new conference centre at the Cape Town Waterfront Breakwater Lodge, from Tuesday 25 to Thursday 27 June 2019. A pre-conference e-resource training workshop was held on Monday, 24 June. While there was a wide array of relevant topics covered, there was a strong focus on the transition to open access and transformational agreements.

The presentations were recorded and they can be freely accessed below together with pdf versions of the presentations.

Click here to download the printed programme.

Conference Presentations

Jeffrey MacKie-Mason, Professor, School of Information and Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley.  Jeffrey is also the University Librarian and Chief Digital Scholarship Officer at UC Berkeley and co-chairs the University of California Publisher Negotiations Task Force. The University of California is a ten–campus system responsible for 10% of the scholarly output of the United States and a leading proponent of open access.

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Pathways to Open Access: the University of California Experience
Following the 12th Berlin Open Access Conference in 2015, and the release of the OA2020 Expression of Interest, the University of California Academic Senate and Libraries set forth to develop a new commitment to rapid transformation of the scholarly publishing industry to accomplish universal open access. The first step was to develop a coalition in agreement on objectives, strategies and tactics. This was achieved and announced in several published documents in the first months of 2018, including Pathways to Open Access. The coalition then launched strategic initiatives to deliver on the ambitious goals. In this session Jeffrey will review how the coalition was built, the strategic roadmap they developed, and their first year of actions, including a brief report on their negotiations with publishers to obtain transformative agreements.

University of California multipayer model and workflows for transformative agreements
The University of California Libraries developed a model for transformative (publish-and-read) agreements that meets the needs of North American (and perhaps other) institutions with decentralized research funding and local responsibility for funding scholarly communication. In this session Jeffrey will present the UC model, and discuss the publisher and library workflows needed to support it.

Breaking up with Elsevier
When developing its commitment to obtain a publish-and-read contract, the University of California Libraries knew that they might need to cancel their Big Deal subscription with Elsevier if agreement could not be reached. Thus planning for possible cancellation began more than six months before the end of the previous contract. In this session Jeffrey will discuss the analysis they undertook to prepare for cancellation, and their plans for implementing alternative access. He will also discuss the extensive communications campaign developed to keep our faculty and students informed.

How the University of California prepares for negotiations
The University of California met regularly with Elsevier over an eight month period; and has also been negotiating transformative agreements with other publishers. In this session Jeffrey will discuss pragmatics: how the negotiation team was formed, roles, preparation, and negotiation tactics.

Pathways to Open Access: the University of California Experience 

University of California multipayer model and workflows for transformative agreements 

Breaking up with Elsevier

How the University of California prepares for negotiations

Stephen Hawthorne is VP Sales EMEA for ProQuest and has over 20 years’ global experience in the information solutions industry working with both commercial (Reed Elsevier) and not-for-profit (Royal Society of Chemistry) publishing organizations in sales, marketing and publishing roles.  Stephen is a native of Northern Ireland where he graduated in Economics from the Queen’s University of Belfast. He now lives in Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.

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What do students and faculty need in a research database?
Universities sit at the heart of an ecosystem focused on solving global challenges.  Learning, teaching and research are taking more collaborative and multi-disciplinary approaches in helping address these challenges.  Universities therefore are seeking resources and innovative business models to support their patrons with the content, tools and services they need to enable critical thinking, engage with the wider society and build research expertise.   ProQuest is working to ensure our university partners have such resources.

What do students and faculty need in a research database?

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Colin Wright retired as Professor: Computational Mathematics from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) with the rank Emeritus Research Professor. In addition to considerable academic management experience he has also been the Research Manager: Centre for High Performance Computing, has managed the South African National Research Network (SANREN) and, in 2008, he motivated for the establishment of the Very Large Database initiative (now called the Data Intensive Research Initiative for SA). As Special Advisor to the SA National Integrated Cyber Infrastructure System (NICIS) he led the implementation. Colin was also a member of the G7+O5 Research Data Infrastructure Working Group, an EU FP7/9 reviewer and a member of H2020 Research Infrastructures and e-Infrastructures Advisory Group. He is currently a member of the SA Research Infrastructure Roadmap Steering Committee and of the SA DST-EU Working Group, and has advised on the SA national Open Science policy.

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The implications of recent Open Science developments
Open Science (OS), or Open Research has, in recent times, become a topic of intense interest … why? OS comprises broad and embracing strategies and practices with many implications. We explore the merits, advantages and challenges as well as benefits of this innovative, contemporary mode of research. DST recently published the now Cabinet adopted White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation (March 2019) which advocates the adoption of the OS approach in the pursuit, practice, funding, governance and promotion of research in this country. Open Innovation and Citizen Science require novel approaches. Should South African institutions and researchers embrace this approach in order to achieve national, global or local institutional research compatibility—or not? Are there implications for the professional librarian, the library and indeed for SANLiC?

The implications of recent Open Science developments

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Ina Smith’s research focus is on promoting digital skills, open access, open science and open data publishing in the global South, with specific emphasis on Africa. She holds a Masters’ Degree from the University of Pretoria in Computer-Integrated Education, a Higher Education Teaching Diploma, and an Honours Degree in Library and Information Science. She has considerable experience working in open access at the University of Pretoria and Stellenbosch University; she has developed training materials and presented training course in digital skills. Ina is currently a project manager at the Academy of Science of SA, where she manages the African Open Science Platform project. She is also a DOAJ Ambassador for southern Africa. Ina is a long-standing active member of LIASA and has won several awards. In her personal capacity, Ina offers training in digital citizenship as co-director of In the Cloud: Creating Digital Citizens (MICT SETA accredited training company). She takes a keen interest in the research process and actively promotes lifelong learning in preparation for the challenges of the 4th Industrial Revolution.

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Accelerating science, technology and innovation through Open Data and Open Science – the African Open Science Platform
Data – both in raw and processed format, and in addition to monographs, research articles and other forms of research output – is an increasingly valuable information resource. This is the result of an environment driven by data, referred to as the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Data has always been at the heart of science, technology and innovation but, while the sharing of information Increased the speed of technological change in the 18th Century, data is the Fourth Industrial Revolution. To illustrate this point, in 2013, the total amount of digital data in circulation was estimated to be 4.4 zettabytes; by 2020 it is expected to grow to 44 zettabytes. To be of benefit to communities, data needs to well curated and FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable and re-usable). The African Open Science Platform conducted a study to find out the status of Open Data and Open Science on the African continent. This paper will share selected findings from the report with the aim of stimulating thought on the role of libraries in ensuring data remains available to those communities that should benefit from it.

Accelerating science, technology and innovation through Open Data and Open Science – the African Open Science Platform

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Belinda Boucher started her career in 1996, as a junior librarian at the Agricultural Research Council (ARC). She moved to the IT and Systems Department, as Systems Developer and Systems Librarian, responsible for developing in-house systems for the ARC, while managing the library system. In 2003 she was appointed as Electronic Content Librarian at the Tshwane University of Technology, where she assisted with the development of TUT’s own Electronic Resources Portal and the development of the electronic resources portfolio and the management thereof. In 2007 she joined SWETS as Client Services Executive and six months later as Business Development Executive. In 2010 she moved back to the Tshwane University of Technology as Electronic Content Librarian and graduated in 2016 as Master in Information Technology from the University of Pretoria.

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Flipping out, over flipping the flip? Understanding the challenges concerning the open access flip, not to flip-out but to flip-in.
Open access (OA) promised many advantages to academia. However, the main issue concerning the flip remains the ever-increasing costs of the big deals but more so free access and the right to use quality published research. It is clear that most publishing houses embrace OA, since they have found ways to maintain their stream of income, in spite of the OA flip, concentrating on quantity and not quality.  Since gold OA publishing is being embraced by both the academic sector and libraries, it maintains the high quality and standard of research articles, as the same journals that authors were used to in the past, are used, simultaneously managing the stigma of predatory publishing within the OA world.  The investments in big deals are therefore the same investments to be made in gold OA access, but through author processing charges.  By way of manipulation, this paper will investigate and focus on the challenges faced in making the open access movement a success, in spite of the same pot of money  being used, making librarians flip in, not flip-out.

Flipping out, over flipping the flip? Understanding the challenges concerning the open access flip, not to flip-out but to flip-in.

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Asdaa Kotani is the Vice President of Institutional Sales, Eastern Europe, Middle East, Africa and Central Asia (EEMEACA) at Springer Nature. Based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, he currently manages the Institutional Sales teams for Eastern Europe, Russia, the Middle East and India. He finds the work both challenging and satisfying and enjoys meeting and working with many interesting people. In his spare time, he enjoys cooking (especially barbeques), spending time with his family and playing football.

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Springer Nature e-books.
This presentation will briefly highlight the disciplines covered by the collections, how they can be accessed and how the collections can benefit library users with different scientific backgrounds.

Springer Nature e-books.

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Caroline Zhou has nine years’ experience in the Marketing Department of CNKI International. She is currently head of Global Government and Research Institutes Business Units of CNKI International. Caroline is responsible for providing information on Chinese academic achievements in the sciences and social sciences and knowledge solutions to the global academic market.

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Knowledge empowers innovation: CNKI’s international services
This presentation will introduce China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the biggest e-resources provider in China. CNKI is the definitive gateway to Chinese scholarly communication. China has made great strides in scientific innovation in recent years, and CNKI is the best resource for accessing this information.

Knowledge empowers innovation: CNKI’s international services

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Martin Rasmussen is Managing Director of Copernicus Meetings and Open Access Publications. Before joining Copernicus, Martin studied geoinformatics, environmental chemistry and physics at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, completed his MSC in hydrology and worked in systems analysis and modelling. He now speaks regularly at conferences on open access publishing and open data and has contributed to working groups dealing with open access financing, transparent peer-review approaches, and data citation. He is co-founder of the Open Access Scholarly Publisher Association (OASPA), an advisory board member of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), and a member of both the Publications Committee and the Programme Committee of the European Geosciences Union.

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The real costs of OA publishing and the potential of a fully OA paradigm in scholarly communication
The triumph of open-access (OA) publishing in the STM disciplines has been enabled through the availability of research funds, keeping the hurdle of article processing charges (APCs) for authors relatively low. At the same time, STM publishing has suffered from the journal crisis with 400% growth in subscription fees over 20 years. This artificially increased subscription income motivated traditional publishers to calculate their APCs for OA publications by dividing the turnover by the number of articles. They claim €3,000–€5,000 per article.
Concurrently, newly founded pure open-access publishers have developed new business models. Their APCs are much lower. This presentation will show what the real costs of OA publishing are. Furthermore, applying the OA principle has much more to offer than free access to scientific literature. The second dimension is public access to the peer review of a manuscript with commenting options prior to publication, and the third dimension makes all assets of a paper freely accessible (e.g. data sets, software code, videos, or samples) enabling reproduction and reuse of scientific results.

The real costs of OA publishing and the potential of a fully OA paradigm in scholarly communication

Alexander Kohls supports the SCOAP3 collaboration to ensure its financial and operational effectiveness. Alex acts as an intermediary between the 3,000 partner institutions of the initiative on the one side and the commercial and society publishers on the other side. Alex also heads the CERN Scientific Information Service, which includes the CERN Library and the CERN Historic Archive. In collaboration with international partners, his team develops and operates some of the key digital repository solutions for particle physics. Alex holds a degree in business administration and joined CERN with 20 years’ experience from the financial industry where he worked in various senior roles primarily in operations, project and business management.

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Collaborating for the good – an analysis of the impact of SCOAP3
SCOAP3, the Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access in Particle Physics, was one of the pioneers of a large-scale collaborative model to achieve open access to journal articles. The initiative started in 2014 and has since converted almost 30,000 journal articles at no cost to individual authors. Alex Kohls, the Operations Manager of SCOAP3 will present a review of five years of SCOAP3 and highlight the impact the initiative had on the researcher and library community in particle physics and beyond.

Collaborating for the good – an analysis of the impact of SCOAP3

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Ben Townsend is VP of Global Library Sales, EMEA & APAC. Ben joined Blackwell Science in 1999, initially working in Society membership services before moving on to a number of different Sales and Marketing roles with Blackwell Publishing and subsequently Wiley (with a short stint as a medical books publisher in between). Ben is responsible for the Wiley Library Sales organization in EMEA and APAC regions, leading the development and implementation of global sales strategies for the Library market.

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Supporting the transition to open access
This session will provide an overview of Wiley’s involvement in transitional agreements around Europe to date. Ben and Liz will share the successes, challenges and complexities encountered with the different Open Science mandates and individual customer requirements. Finally, they will discuss how Wiley has been engaging with its society partners in this transition process.

Supporting the transition to open access

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Colleen Campbell leads outreach and engagement in the Open Access 2020 Initiative, which is coordinated by the Max Planck Digital Library on behalf of the global research community. Passionate about libraries and the exciting changes underway in scholarly communication, Colleen leads activities that enable stakeholders to take pro-active steps toward creating a fair, sustainable and open information environment. Recently she coordinated the 14th Berlin Open Access Conference in which delegations from 37 countries voiced the shared expectation that subscription publishers work with all members of the global research community to effect complete and immediate open access. Previously European Director for Strategic Partnerships for JSTOR and the digital preservation service Portico, she has over 20 years’ experience across all areas of the academic information sector. Colleen serves on the LIBER Open Access Working Group and is an elected member of the UKSG Main Committee. Formerly an actress, she holds a BA in Drama, an MA in Italian Studies and lives near Florence, Italy.

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Transformative agreements in practice
Libraries and consortia around the world are increasingly adopting Transformative Agreements to enable the many benefits of open access for their researchers and society at large. More recently, the Plan S Principles issued by the research funding organizations of cOALition S has contributed to the uptake of Transformative Agreements globally. As an introduction to the panel session on Transformative Agreements, Colleen will provide an overview of the underlying rationale for and mechanisms of transformative agreements.

How to deal with no deal: alternative access to journal articles
Whether in the context of an agreement cancellation, stalled negotiations or merely because libraries cannot afford to license everything, it is important to understand just how much subscription journal content is available open access and how institutions and their researchers are tapping into it. In this session, Colleen will highlight some of the many tools that can be used to connect researchers to the content they need.

Building blocks and benchmarks of the OA transition: the ESAC Initiative
The ESAC Initiative defines Transformative Agreements as “contracts negotiated between institutions (libraries, national and regional consortia) and publishers that transform the business model underlying scholarly journal publishing, moving from one based on toll access (subscription) to one in which publishers are remunerated a fair price for their open access publishing services”.  However, as these agreements are, by nature, temporary and transitional, there is no standard model, and the agreements negotiated to date are considered to be iterative by both libraries/consortia and publishers. At the same time, all Transformative Agreements have certain characteristics that are consistent, starting with the very principles and objectives and moving down to new workflow requirements. In this session Colleen will introduce the ESAC Initiative and its many features at the service of libraries and consortia who wish to know more about transformative agreements.

Transformative agreements in practice

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How to deal with no deal: alternative access to journal articles

Building blocks and benchmarks of the OA transition: the ESAC Initiative

Panel Discussion – Exploring the largest national transformative agreement for scholarly communication
In January 2019, the publisher John Wiley & Sons and the Projekt DEAL, a representative of nearly 700 academic institutions in Germany, entered a ground breaking transformative agreement which allows researchers at Projekt DEAL institutions the opportunity to publish their articles accepted for publication in Wiley’s subscription journals fully open access and provides all Projekt DEAL institutions with access to read Wiley’s academic journals back to the year 1997. The innovative “Publish and Read” cost model behind the agreement sees former subscription expenditures shifted to support open access publishing, in line with the objectives of the Open Access 2020 Initiative. A panel of experts from the publisher, library and research communities will discuss the significance of the agreement in the evolving landscape of scholarly communication. The panel discussion is facilitated by Colleen Campbell.

Prof. Gerard Meijer is Director of the Fritz Haber Institute (FHI) of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, Germany. His luminous scientific career and impactful research have earned him numerous recognitions among which being elected member of the Academia Europaea in 2013 and a royal decoration and conference of Knighthood in the Order of the Netherlands Lion in 2017. In 2012 he was appointed President of the Executive Board of Radboud University in Nijmegen and during his tenure lead, on behalf of the VSNU (Association of Universities in the Netherlands), the ground breaking negotiations with the major subscription publishers (most notably Elsevier), effectively taking the first step in the transition of today’s scholarly journals to Open Access.

Liz Ferguson leads Wiley’s Open Access strategy and is also responsible for accelerated growth within key subjects in Wiley’s global journal portfolio. She played a significant role in launching Wiley’s Open Access program and developed Wiley’s position on data sharing. Liz is a member of the Royal Society’s Publishing Board, the External Advisory Board of DataONE, and the Universities UK OA Efficiencies Working Group. She has served two terms on the Board of Dryad, and has been on the organizing committee of the Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing since 2013.

Panel Discussion – Exploring the largest national transformative agreement for scholarly communication

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George Kowal has 20 years’ experience in providing tools and resources to the scholarly and academic community. Currently Head of Sales, Licensing and Customer Engagement at the American Psychological Association (APA), George is responsible for providing solutions across all markets by bringing APA’s premier content to all the communities served by our global publishing operations. In support of APA’s mission in “advancing psychology to benefiting society and improve people’s lives”, George is responsible for APA Books which includes resources for APA Style, Life Tools, Magination Press and reference/scholarly titles.

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American Psychological Association – the story behind our mission as an association publisher
This session will feature a look at the APA as an association publisher, and how our mission drives our products.  The session will also review key updates to APA’s data base products such as PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, PsycBOOKS, PsycTHERAPY and PsycTESTS.

American Psychological Association – the story behind our mission as an association publisher

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Caroline Dean is Principal Librarian in the Acquisitions Department at the University of Cape Town (UCT) Libraries, a position she has held since July 2013. Prior roles include Electronic Resources Librarian (June 2000 to September 2013) and manager of the Commerce Information Services Section (August 2007 to July 2011). Her library career started out in the UCT Health Sciences Library where she occupied various roles between December 1991 and mid-2000. She holds a BSc from Stellenbosch University and an MBibl from UCT.

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e-Resource collection development policy
“Libraries without collection development policies are like businesses without business plans.” So writes Peggy Johnson in her book Fundamentals of collection development and management (2014, 3rd ed). In this presentation we will define what a collection development policy (CDP) is and outline its purpose. We will touch on the various components that comprise a CDP and discuss the need for an e-resource CDP.

e-Resource collection development policy

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Isabel Basson is currently working as a post-doctoral fellow at CREST after obtaining a doctorate in Science and Technology Studies at Stellenbosch University in 2019. Her doctoral studies investigated whether gold open access journal articles experience a citation advantage using different measures of citation advantage. Before joining the SciSTIP team Isabel worked at the HSRC on the South African R&D survey. Her current research interests are: bibliometrics, scientometrics and journal publication policies with a focus on open access publishing.

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Open access citation advantage: an analysis of publication trends of South African researchers
“Advocates for open access (OA) practices proclaim it to have several benefits, for researchers, for science and for society at large. One of the proposed benefits is that the increased visibility provided by gratis access to research leads to OA publications receiving more citations than those publications of which no OA versions are available. We investigated this statement by measuring the percentage of OA journal articles indexed in the Web of Science (WoS) that are cited within five years after publication as well as the percentage that are among the 10% most frequently cited articles and comparing this to the percentage of non-OA journal articles for these two measures. The results were compared between subject areas and to the case for South African authored articles, accompanied by a description of the distribution of OA articles for the years 2001 to 2017.”

Open access citation advantage: an analysis of publication trends of South African researchers

Jaco Blanckenberg obtained a doctorate in physics from Stellenbosch University. His masters and doctoral studies included strong elements of computer simulation and computational physics, both of which require working with, and analysing, large quantities of data. He has been working in the field of bibliometrics as a post-doctoral fellow at CREST since 2015.

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Open access citation advantage: an analysis of publication trends of South African researchers
“Advocates for open access (OA) practices proclaim it to have several benefits, for researchers, for science and for society at large. One of the proposed benefits is that the increased visibility provided by gratis access to research leads to OA publications receiving more citations than those publications of which no OA versions are available. We investigated this statement by measuring the percentage of OA journal articles indexed in the Web of Science (WoS) that are cited within five years after publication as well as the percentage that are among the 10% most frequently cited articles and comparing this to the percentage of non-OA journal articles for these two measures. The results were compared between subject areas and to the case for South African authored articles, accompanied by a description of the distribution of OA articles for the years 2001 to 2017.”

Open access citation advantage: an analysis of publication trends of South African researchers

Mathew Willmott is the Open Access Collection Strategist at the California Digital Library (CDL), where his primary role involves conducting data analysis, financial modelling, and strategic planning relating to transformative agreements, which encompass both access to content and open access publication.  Prior to this role, Mathew served as the data analyst on the Pay-It-Forward project, a Mellon Foundation-funded project conducted by UC Davis and the CDL to investigate the feasibility and sustainability of the APC model for large North American research institutions.  Before starting this project with CDL in May of 2015, Mathew worked for the MIT Libraries in a multi-faceted role including physics librarian responsibilities, collections analysis and assessment, and development and administration of infrastructure supporting the implementation of the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy.

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Tools for Transition: The University of California Pay-It-Forward project and modeling tool
In June 2016, the University of California (led by UC Davis and the California Digital Library) completed an 18-month study to examine the sustainability and feasibility of the article processing charge (APC) business model for large, research-intensive universities in North America.  Outcomes from this study help to guide the University of California’s efforts to transform the scholarly publishing system, and the publicly-available Model Calculation Tool (MCT) developed as a part of the project, can extend the analysis to other research institutions.  This session will provide an overview of the project and its findings, as well as a brief primer on the MCT and how it can be leveraged for use elsewhere.

Tools for Transition: Data analysis to support negotiations for transformative OA agreements
Transformative OA agreements represent a new way of doing business with publishers.  In order to be properly prepared to negotiate for and enter into these agreements, libraries must employ data analysis strategies that go beyond the standard return on investment that is commonly used to measure the value of traditional subscriptions.  This session will examine the analysis strategies and tools that were developed at the California Digital Library to support the University of California’s negotiations for transformative OA agreements with Elsevier, Cambridge University Press, and many other publishers.

Tools for Transition: The University of California Pay-It-Forward project and modeling tool

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Data analysis to support negotiations for transformative OA agreements

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David Elek is Sales Manager for the Middle East, South Asia and Africa at Brill. He formerly held similar positions at Springer, Blackwell and OCLC.

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Brill Evidence Select: a new evidence-based acquisition (EBA) model for e-books
This presentation will provide a brief overview of the new Brill Evidence Select EBA model. Brill Evidence Select gives librarians control over the development of their collections, while enabling them to address the e-book demands of their users.

Brill Evidence Select: a new evidence-based acquisition (EBA) model for e-books

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Mary Lister is the Library Manager at the University of Cape Town (UCT) Graduate School of Business (GSB). Mary’s passion for supporting and guiding students and faculty includes facilitating introductory information training sessions on the information resources available as well as one-on-one sessions throughout the year. This has honed her presentations skills and her interest and expertise with user interfaces and user experiences. She holds a BA, an HDLIS, and an HDE (PG)Sec all from UCT, a Post Graduate Diploma in School Media Studies (UNISA), and a Train the Trainer Certificate (CPUT). She is a Certified Mendeley Librarian.

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User Experience = User Interface + Role of the Librarian
User experience begins with the user’s initial interface with an academic portal and at each interaction, the user, depending on their skills, knowledge, motivation and persistence, may continue or drop out. It is the function of the library website to facilitate the initial engagement, and then the responsibility of each database or platform to provide an experience that will allow the user to access what they need and discover the full potential of that database. The question is asked: Do users who need an article which an academic has written and published in a journal need to understand this “land between” – the role of Google, Google Scholar, Primo (or another library platform), the filter of the Library website, the databases, the platforms, open-access vs paid for content? This presentation explores the role of the librarian and the user interface in ensuring an excellent user experience and ultimately, the quality of research they produce.

Is there an alternative to “death by PowerPoint?”
Do your PowerPoint presentations send your audience to sleep? Do your Prezi presentations make your audience feel seasick? A range of skills, an ability to read your audience, good knowledge of your topic, combined with a passion for your area of expertise are all elements that will result in a successful presentation. In this presentation, we will focus on how to make your presentations relevant, interesting and memorable.

User Experience = User Interface + Role of the Librarian

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Is there an alternative to “death by PowerPoint?”

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Matthew Ragucci is the Library Solution Architect at Wiley. He provides insight on metadata sharing strategies for optimizing electronic resources and improving library customer experience. He currently serves as vice chair of the NASIG Standards Committee and is a member of the NISO Platform Migration Working Group. He also holds a part-time position as a reference and instruction librarian at Brookdale Community College. Matthew earned his Master’s in Library and Information Science (MLIS) from Rutgers University.  His publications are “Evidence-Based Acquisition: A Real Life Account of Managing the Program Within The Orbis Cascade Alliance” and “MARC Metamorphosis: Transforming the Way You Look at E-Book Records.” His interests include metadata, standards, reference, and user experience.

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99 Knowledgebase problems: a KBART crash course
Seldom do aspiring librarians predict that they will be the ones managing the intricacies of electronic resources.  Yet, many are charged with complicated and unique tasks, like having to align resources in vendor knowledge bases.  This can often be a confusing and frustrating process for librarians.  This session will provide a brief overview of the KBART standard, its place in the electronic resource workflows, trends, and how librarians can avoid some common knowledgebase issues.

99 Knowledgebase problems: a KBART crash course

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Kusturie Moodley is the Co-ordinator: Material Acquisitions Librarian at the Durban University of Technology(DUT) Library where she manages all aspects of the acquisitions, periodicals and e-resources workflows. Her areas of interest include emerging technologies, collection development, open access, data science and information services. Kusturie earned her MLIS and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Data Science from Syracuse University School of Information Studies. She also holds a Bachelor of Accounting Science and Honours in Bachelor of Information Science from the University of South Africa.

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Influencing the collection: small-scale Patron‐driven acquisitions at the Durban University of Technology (DUT) Library
The challenge for all libraries is creating an effective and appropriate library collection. Historically, collection development in academic libraries was based on assumptions about patron needs. However, the trend over the past couple of years has shifted from a “just-in-case” model to an evidence-based “just-in-time” model. Patron-driven acquisition (PDA) has been gaining much popularity, predominately in the online information environment, involving the patron in the process of building and shaping the library’s collections. The DUT Library has been experimenting with the use of patron-driven acquisitions (PDAs) since 2016 and library patrons—unbeknownst to them—have been playing a part in building the library collections. This paper will discuss the experience of the DUT Library’s foray into small-scale patron-driven acquisition (PDA) and will explore the benefits and challenges in implementing a PDA plan.

Influencing the collection: small-scale Patron‐driven acquisitions at the Durban University of Technology (DUT) Library

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Naomi Visser is Manager: e-Resources at the Library and Information Service, Stellenbosch University. She has held this position since 2013, before which she was Faculty Librarian for Arts & Social Sciences at the same institution.

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An investigation into alternatives to IP authentication for access to e-resources at Stellenbosch University (SU)
Until recently, IP authentication combined with a proxy server for off-campus access has been the most common solution worldwide to authorizing access to licensed e-resources. This is also the case at SU where EZproxy is the proxy server of choice. For various reasons, however, there has been a growing interest in eliminating IP authentication in favour of federated access and single user sign-on. At SU, a working group was tasked to investigate next-generation systems in order to make a recommendation regarding an alternative to EZproxy for accessing online information sources, for implementation, if indicated. The working group compared EZproxy, OpenAthens and RA21 based on the following points: cost, user experience, impact on library staff, privacy and vendors. The results of this investigation are summarized in this presentation.

An investigation into alternatives to IP authentication for access to e-resources at Stellenbosch University (SU)

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Guy Halse is the Director: Trust & Identity at TENET. Trust & Identity is a term used within research and education networking to describe a suite of related services and technologies focused around building and supporting collaboration capability within institutions and across borders. In South Africa, Guy’s Trust & Identity portfolio embraces ORCID, eduroam, the SAFIRE identity federation, and a certification authority. Prior to joining TENET, he was Rhodes University’s IT Operations Manager, and was involved in the technical operations of the SEALS library consortium.

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The library and the NREN (co-presenting)
Just as libraries are evolving, so too are the world’s national research and education networks (NRENs). The last few years have seen great synergies between the library and the NREN. Globally, publishers, libraries and NRENs have been working together under the banner of the RA21 (Resource Access for the 21st century) project to make access to journals and other electronic resources simpler and more intuitive for users. While RA21 is still finalising its recommendations, TENET, as the operator of the South African NREN, has already offered to host an African instance of the infrastructure that would be required to make this a reality. Similarly, through the SAFIRE identity federation we have helped South African university consortia to leverage expensive resources more effectively. No discussion of “the library and the NREN” would be complete without mention of ORCID, and the role NRENs are playing in supporting ORCID in their communities.

The library and the NREN (co-presenting)

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Wesley Barry is a Systems Administrator and ORCID specialist at TENET. Wesley started his career building and supporting library systems at the University of Cape Town before moving into more general IT. At TENET, his library background has made him the ideal person to provide ORCID consortium members with integration support. He is also more broadly involved in the suite of trust & identity services TENET provides.

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The library and the NREN (co-presenting)
Just as libraries are evolving, so too are the world’s national research and education networks (NRENs). The last few years have seen great synergies between the library and the NREN. Globally, publishers, libraries and NRENs have been working together under the banner of the RA21 (Resource Access for the 21st century) project to make access to journals and other electronic resources simpler and more intuitive for users. While RA21 is still finalising its recommendations, TENET, as the operator of the South African NREN, has already offered to host an African instance of the infrastructure that would be required to make this a reality. Similarly, through the SAFIRE identity federation we have helped South African university consortia to leverage expensive resources more effectively. No discussion of “the library and the NREN” would be complete without mention of ORCID, and the role NRENs are playing in supporting ORCID in their communities.

The library and the NREN (co-presenting)

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Gladys Ngwenya completed a BBibl at the University of the Western Cape and began her career as a librarian in 1999 at Bramley Primary School in Johannesburg. In 2001, she joined the Pharmaceutical Society of South Africa as a trainer and a year later joined the Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Ltd. (ATNS) as Air Traffic Management Officer. In 2009, ATNS established a specialized library providing International Civil Aviation Organization documentation and information services. Gladys became the first library manager. She is passionate about encouraging ATNS staff to use the library resources.

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Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS) Roadmap of reviewing and implementing the e-Library Information Services
Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS) provides air traffic, navigation, training and associated services within South Africa and a large part of the southern Indian and Atlantic Ocean, comprising approximately 10% of the world’s airspace. ATNS strives to be the preferred supplier of air traffic management solutions and associated services to the African continent as well as selected international markets. Recently, ATNS reviewed its strategies and, amongst others, decided to expand the library services to meet its organizational objectives of becoming a transformative organisation that invests in its staff; and, providing effective solutions and associated services that meet the needs and expectations of the ATM community. Based on this, the library team reviewed and optimised the library services and resources to meet the organisational vision and objectives. This paper will outline the roadmap that they followed.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS) Roadmap of reviewing and implementing the e-Library Information Services

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Gemma Deakin is a Research Manager in the Customer Insights team at Elsevier, having joined the company in 2011 after six years working in a market research agency in London. She manages several research programs used to drive action in the business and to help shape Elsevier strategy. The Customer Insights team works in partnership with external groups to deepen understanding of the scholarly landscape across the industry. Gemma has a BA Honours degree in Sociology from the University of Sussex.

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What will the world of research look like 10 years from now?
The research ecosystem is undergoing rapid and profound change. This transformation is being fuelled by a wide range of factors, from advances in technology and funding pressures to political uncertainty and population shifts. To understand how these trends might shape the research landscape in the decade ahead, Elsevier joined forces with Ipsos MORI, one of the world’s largest research agencies. Together, they conducted a large-scale, future-scoping and scenario-planning study that examines how research will be created and exchanged. The presentation will review the three plausible future scenarios developed as part of ‘Research futures: drivers and scenarios for the next decade’ project. We will discuss how they were derived and their implications for the present.

Link to report: https://www.elsevier.com/connect/elsevier-research-futures-report

What will the world of research look like 10 years from now?

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Daniel Solomon began his career in education over a decade ago, selling printed text books at universities in the Middle East for Pearson Education. He then went into global online student recruitment for Ivy League Universities in the USA, Canada and the United Kingdom. In 2016, he was hired as the country manager for Gale Cengage, based in Dubai.

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Digital Humanities Archives
Gale Cengage has, for many years, provided the world’s largest digital humanities archives collections, giving researchers online access to rare historical manuscript collections previously restricted to academic reading rooms or microfilm. While some resources include highly edited selections, these archives contain complete collections, allowing researchers to discover opposing views and perspectives, and to conduct interdisciplinary and comparative analyses. Researchers of all levels can explore new questions, discover original connections and enrich lectures, papers and discussions.

Digital Humanities Archives

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Tracey October-Vilakazi is the Regional Manager for Southern Africa and Head of Research Management Solutions for Africa at Clarivate Analytics’s Web of Science Group. She has a Bachelors Degree in International Relations and a Masters Degree in Political Science from Vrij University Brussels and Université Libre de Bruxelles, respectively.

For several years Tracey has worked with research institutions across the continent, to increase their research output and impact, and drive innovation. One of her key areas of focus is to develop strategies to manage and showcase African research on a global scale.

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The state of open access publications in South Africa
Open Access is expected to enable and accelerate research discovery at a global level. This study sheds light on the state of open access in South Africa, through a data-driven approach. The study seeks to answer questions around which fields and institutions are the most prolific in this area, the type of Open Access most utilized in the region and what it means for the impact of research measured through citations. A critical component is to contextualize the South African research landscape within the trends of global research and analyse the affects that the global Open Access agenda, such as plan S, will have on research funding in the Global South.

The state of open access publications in South Africa

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Louis van Niekerk is an attorney specialising in commercial law and a partner at Dorrington Jessop Inc. in Cape Town.  He assists clients with a wide variety of commercial matters, including company law, commercial agreements, non-profit law, Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment structures and consumer law.  His clients range from start-ups, non-profits, schools and universities to small, medium and multinational commercial enterprises.  Louis enjoys the challenge of engaging with complex problems and trying to find simple, effective solutions.  His firm has a strong commitment to social upliftment, conservation and education and assists many non-profit organisations operating in those sectors.   Louis has a passion for learning new things and believes that it is our duty to share our knowledge with others.

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Subscription Agreements and South African Law
Subscription Agreements are the cornerstone of educational institutions’ access to essential electronic resources, yet may pose a number of challenges where one party is located in South Africa and the other is overseas.  This talk briefly considers the key provisions of such agreements as well as potential challenges that arise in the South African context, including the use of electronic signatures, jurisdiction, protection of personal information and the use of alternative access methods, such as Sci-Hub.

Subscription Agreements and South African Law

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